Study High School in Finland – Myths vs Facts

s it not safe to study abroad in Finland during the pandemic? Is Finnish a complex language to learn? Is it too early to start high school in a foreign country? These are some common misconceptions when parents and students consider studying high school abroad in Finland. What are the facts behind these misconceptions? Let’s verify them now!

1. It’s not safe to study abroad during the pandemic

When arriving in Finland, all students get vaccinated. By August 2021, around 70% of the Finnish population already got the first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine. In fact, in comparison with the US, the UK and other countries in Europe, Finland has a much smaller number of Covid-19 infected cases. Additionally, Finland can assure students a safe place to study and live in with the advanced healthcare system. It’s undeniable that the pandemic effect is global, yet we would learn to adapt to the new normal rather than let it block our plans.

 A student from High School Program 2021 got vaccinated in Finland.

2. It’s too early to study abroad since high school

Many parents think 15 – 16 is too early for children to leave home and live in another country. However, at this age, the children can live independently without parental protection. In addition, they will receive support from their school and city. Each school and city will assign guardians to support students in emergencies such as fire, emergency, injury, etc., and support students when they first arrive in the town.

It is an innovative mindset to perceive this time as a good time for the kids to explore the world, experience new culture and develop social skills. Receiving high-quality education from this young age, they can fundamentally acquire knowledge to make big decisions for the future career path or academic path. 

3. Finnish is a complex language to learn

If you can learn Maths, you can also learn Finnish. Finnish is a logical language with principles and rules similar to Maths. Like any other foreign language, as long as learners study hard, they can master it! Especially at a young age, they are highly capable of acquiring a new language quickly. When learning Finnish with Finest Future, students study with native speakers, which helps them boost their linguistic skills in a shorter time. So far, after six months of learning Finnish, all students joining the High School 2021 program have successfully acquired the necessary level of Finnish to start high school.

Students in High School Program 2021 study Finnish with local teachers

4. Eleventh graders & above are over-aged to apply for the high school

Not only 11th graders and the older can join the high school program, but students over the age of 18 are also eligible to apply. However, all students have to retake courses of 10th grade. Students cannot convert points, subjects/credits studied to classes in Finland, which indicates that they have to start high school from the beginning. That is the sole element students need to pay attention to when applying to the program.

5. Schools in big cities are better than those in smaller cities

This might be a common belief in many countries, but never in Finland. According to the Finnish Ministry of Education regulations, the quality of education in Finland is EQUAL. School in a bigger city does not mean better quality and vice versa. In fact, for international students, who need more support from teachers, a smaller school is a wiser choice. With a smaller group of students, teachers have more time to provide individual support and attention.

6. It’s boring to study and live in Finland since it’s cold and sparsely populated

Because Finland is located in northern Europe, people often think it’s never sunny or warm here. In fact, Finland has four beautiful seasons and only gets cold & snowy during winter. Although Finland has a low population, it is compensated with magnificent nature and many famous tourist attractions. After school or during semester breaks, students can easily enjoy many outdoor activities in Finland and travel to other countries in the European Union.  

Students on the ferry, on their way to visit new places in Finland!